Huckleberry finn chapter 5 analysis as

He finds a rusty wood-saw and cuts out a small section of the log cabin wall that he covers with a blanket when his father is around. Chapter six has Pap away from civilization to a cabin on the Illinois shore, which leads the reader to believe that Huck must have originally resided in Missouri, and they travel on the Mississippi River.

His dad is also very interested in obtaining Huck's money, which people throughout the county have been talking about.

huckleberry finn chapter 4 summary

Retrieved July 26, When Huck asks why they could not see all the elephants, Tom explains that some magicians must have turned the whole army into a Sunday School picnic.

Irony appears in other areas of the novel as well. The next morning, he crawls out of the room again, drunk, breaks his arm, and almost freezes to death where he falls.

Huckleberry finn chapter 5 analysis as

While Jim sleeps, Tom wants to play a trick on him. Jim uses a large hairball he believes to have magical abilities to help Huck.

Huckleberry finn chapter 6 summary

At first Jim thinks Huck is a ghost because he heard he had died, but once Huck convinces him that he's alive, Jim is glad to see him. He finds a rusty wood-saw and cuts out a small section of the log cabin wall that he covers with a blanket when his father is around. Huck also thinks about the Christian concept of always helping other people. Thus, books form a foundation for civilization; using books, Tom creates a society for his gang of friends. Huck shells out his one dollar and Pap takes it to buy whiskey with. Eventually, Huck finds an old saw, makes a hole in the wall, and resolves to escape from both Pap and the Widow Douglas, but Pap returns as Huck is about to break free. Since slavery was abolished in , the book must be taking place prior to that since Jim is a slave. For example, in determining that he would prefer heaven over hell after Miss Watson describes the two to him, Huck uses very logical reasoning that the reader can understand. Pap's miserable character represents yet another negative element of society. Huck holds a rifle pointed at his sleeping father and waits. Superstition permeates the novel.

The meow is a signal from Tom Sawyer, and Huck replies with a similar meow. It is uncertain which angel will win out, but Huck is safe for now.

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Notes on Chapter 5 from Huckleberry Finn